ICU RN, PNWer, ATCK, theological mis-fit

morethanjustanurse:

United in the belief that they were putting soldier’s interests before their own, workers represented themselves as triumphing over errant surgeons and a hospital system designed to promote efficiency at the cost of humanity - Jane E. Schultz, Women at the Front, p. 7

I’ve been reading this…

whoneedsfeminism:

"I need feminism because I live in Brazil and 65% of brazilians agree that ‘women that wear short clothes DESERVE being raped’"
Currently, a search from IPEA (Instituo de Pesquisa Econômica Aplicada - Apllied Economic Research Institute) depicts how violence against women is still tolerated in Brazil. Most brazilians think that those women who wear clothes that reveal parts os the body deserve to be attacked. It’s also the majority group that believes that “if the woman knew how to behave”, rape statistics would be lower.
#EuNãoMereçoSerEstuprada #IDon’tDeserveBeingRaped

whoneedsfeminism:

"I need feminism because I live in Brazil and 65% of brazilians agree that ‘women that wear short clothes DESERVE being raped’"

Currently, a search from IPEA (Instituo de Pesquisa Econômica Aplicada - Apllied Economic Research Institute) depicts how violence against women is still tolerated in Brazil. Most brazilians think that those women who wear clothes that reveal parts os the body deserve to be attacked. It’s also the majority group that believes that “if the woman knew how to behave”, rape statistics would be lower.

#EuNãoMereçoSerEstuprada #IDon’tDeserveBeingRaped

femininefreak:

Sex Education in American Public Schools

I had no idea. I don’t know how they defined “medically accurate”, but the picture under that one is rather disturbing. 

scienceyoucanlove:

Stress affects children too. Children who grow up in stressful situations have shorter telomeres, an early sign of genetic ageing that makes them vulnerable to diseases such as cancer. Telomeres shrink when cells divide, but when they get too short, the cell can’t divide and dies.Read more: http://bit.ly/1kN6GKK via The Sydney Morning Herald - smh.com.au
source

scienceyoucanlove:

Stress affects children too. Children who grow up in stressful situations have shorter telomeres, an early sign of genetic ageing that makes them vulnerable to diseases such as cancer. Telomeres shrink when cells divide, but when they get too short, the cell can’t divide and dies.

Read more: http://bit.ly/1kN6GKK via The Sydney Morning Herald - smh.com.au

source

pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 7, 1994: Rwanda Civil War Begins
Twenty years ago today, Hutu gunmen systematically start tracking down and killing moderate Hutu politicians and Tutsi leaders. The deputy to the U.S. ambassador in Rwanda tells Washington that the killings involve not just political murders, but genocide.
Thousands die on the first day, setting off 100 days of slaughter.
Follow FRONTLINE’s Rwandan Genocide timeline to learn about significant events, statements and decisions that reveal how the United States and the West chose not to act to save hundreds of thousands of lives in the Rwandan genocide of 1994.
Photo: A woman consoles Bizimana Emmanuel, 22, during the 20th anniversary commemoration of the 1994 genocide at Amahoro Stadium April 7, 2014 in Kigali, Rwanda. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 7, 1994: Rwanda Civil War Begins

Twenty years ago today, Hutu gunmen systematically start tracking down and killing moderate Hutu politicians and Tutsi leaders. The deputy to the U.S. ambassador in Rwanda tells Washington that the killings involve not just political murders, but genocide.

Thousands die on the first day, setting off 100 days of slaughter.

Follow FRONTLINE’s Rwandan Genocide timeline to learn about significant events, statements and decisions that reveal how the United States and the West chose not to act to save hundreds of thousands of lives in the Rwandan genocide of 1994.

Photo: A woman consoles Bizimana Emmanuel, 22, during the 20th anniversary commemoration of the 1994 genocide at Amahoro Stadium April 7, 2014 in Kigali, Rwanda. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

chizuu:

a little comic dedicated to a friend

huffingtonpost:

You’re SO vain, cat. 

And so, each morning at more or less ten o’clock, he arrives, rolls his wife outside, wipes her drool, makes sure she’s warm, then watches the bees on the bougainvillea or the liquid food dropping through plastic tubing into a body he once lay awake admiring, timing himself to see how long he could hold back before reaching out with a food, a fingertip, his tongue. It’s much like caring for a baby, he explains to his daughter, except without the sweet smells, without the hope.

—Louise Aronson, from her book A History of the Present Illness

From the time I learned to walk and talk, our family had remarked on my astonishing resemblance to my gram, a woman who somehow fulfilled all conventional expectations while also never doing anything quite the way she was supposed to.

—Louise Aronson, from her book A History of the Present Illness

The baby quilt is finished. It’s less then a week late, but only because the baby was 12 days late!

The baby quilt is finished. It’s less then a week late, but only because the baby was 12 days late!